TEXTURE – 24

This week I’ve been thinking about Texture as an important element in my images. Of course, everything has ‘texture’ to some degree, but capturing that in an image is not straightforward. The answer, in the main, is in the lighting – and certainly side-lighting is a great way to bring out the texture in many subjects.

Using texture as a form of contrast in the image is always powerful, as in the feather and chain shot. I’ll leave it to you to decide if these work for you. That , after all, is the acid test!

Feather and ChainTexture by John Allen-1

Old Paint.Texture by John Allen-2

Rendered BrickworkTexture by John Allen-3

Chasms in the SandTexture by John Allen-4

 

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Ice Patterns – 05

These fantastic patterns appeared on our conservatory windows one morning earlier this week. To good to miss, I took the opportunity to take a few shots using a 60mm macro lens on the Olympus EM1 Mark II – and a tripod.

All backlit with natural light from the garden – and tweaked ( a touch ) in Lightroom Classic CC.

01-ICE PATTERNS by John Allen

02-ICE PATTERNS by John Allen

03-ICE PATTERNS by John Allen

04-ICE PATTERNS by John Allen

Texture – 04

A quiet photography week since our return from Aldeburgh ( see ALDEBURGH – 03 ), so this week I’ve been looking through some older images and, for some reason, homed in on the topic of texture.

It’s been said many times before, but it’s worth repeating – good or bad lighting can make or break a potential image. And this is particularly true if you are looking to capture texture in your image. Have I achieved that in these four images? I’ll let you be the judge of that.

An appropriate subject plus directional side lighting is often the key, although my second image is more ‘soft’ light than directional.

1 & 2 Taken on Northumberland beaches01-texture by john allen03-texture by john allen

3 Aldeburgh Boat04-texture by john allen

4 JohnB through Wet Glass02-texture by john allen

Flash In The Garden – 02

One of my previously broken New Year’s Resolutions was to get to grips with off-camera, outdoor flash photography – away from my usual safety net of a home studio and lots of time!

So eventually, a couple of days ago, I ventured outside into the garden with my Olympus OMD MKII, a 60mm macro lens and flash gun ( on an extension lead ) to catch whatever was about.

The first three images are of a clump of fungi Daphne had spotted growing in a sheltered corner of the garden. Fungi in January? A little unexpected – but then our winter, so far, has been quite mild – nothing to the atrocious weather that has struck parts of continental Europe. Our thoughts go to anyone who is suffering as a result!

01-garden flora by john allen02-garden flora by john allen03-garden floraby john allen

The final image is of grass growing in the crevices of an old tree stump (thanks, Trevor!!). This is probably the result of bird food left in the stump for the passing wildlife – but then again, we’ve not seen much of that over the past few weeks. They are obviously being fed somewhat better further down the road.

04-garden flora by john allen

Poppy Parents

This clump of poppies appears each year on a service road behind a local Tescos supermarket.
It was one of those sites from which, last year, we collected the old poppy heads – and then the seeds. They produced the flower featured in yesterday’s blog post.
On a walk past the location this year I saw the poppies against that old painted hoarding, the blue paint beginning to flake off – and I was really taken by the textures on the panel – and the brilliance of the poppy ‘red’.

I only had my iPhone with me – no other camera – but the phone did the job! I hope you agree.